Jeep Wrangler For Sale Miami, Florida

Subaru Impreza For Sale

Our purpose is to make it easy for you to get the lowest price on a new Toyota Corolla For Sale in Miami without the hassle of dealing with car dealerships and cheesy salesperson Everyone who has ever purchase a new car knows how difficult it can be to get the right price..However, this is not the case with FloridaCarsDealerships.Com. Our website helps you find the best price and the largest rebate on any new vehicle.

Let us find the largest rebate and the best price on your next vehicle purchase. At FloridaCarsDealerships.Com you the client is in control. Our automated search engine technology will search through thousands dealerships for the car you selected. Once we find a match, we will show you a list of dealerships in Miami with available stock on the hybrid of your choosing. After that get all the dealerships in Miami to compete for your business without disclosing your name, address, phone number, and or e-mail address. This process is not only the revolutionary but also a proven method of getting the best deal and the largest factory rebate possible every time.

Who Has The Best Car Deals & Incentives in Miami?

It is without a doubt that the best car deals and incentives are found on the Internet. That is why that we build FloridaCarsDealerships.Com. We knew that by implementing technology and software already available we would revolutionize the car buying experience. Not only that but also get our members the best deal possible on the vehicle of their choice. Did we also mentioned that our service is of no cost to you! What is keeping you back? Get the best new car deal in the biggest factory rebate of any SUV you choose.


Nissan Maxima For Sale

New Line of Honda Cars

US car makers often times sell very high numbers of cars to rental agencies with the plan that after a period of time or a certain number of miles, these cars will be bought back. These cars are known as program cars and after they are bought back they will be reconditioned by the manufacturer and sold to dealerships. The dealerships then either sell them or often times offer them as part of a used car lease deal. If you want a dealer to know you mean business and know what your doing, ask them about program cars.

The advantage of these cars is that they have low mileage and have been well maintained by the rental agency. After they have been returned they have been refurbished again by the manufacturer. Often times these cars will even still have some of their factory guarantee left on them.

The risks of these cars is that they have been driven by a lot of drivers who probably drove them pretty hard and were not to concerned about the treatment of the car. They will not have a previous owner who knows about the strange quirks and problems the car has. Also keep in mind though that each one of these cars has to pass a rigorous inspection by the manufacturer before you can buy it.

Another option to consider for nearly new cars is a factory demonstrator car also known as an executive car. Many factories offer great purchase deals to the factory employees who often times sell their car at the end of each model year and purchase the new one. These cars are almost always low mileage cars in great condition and even still under factory warranty. To find some of these for sale in your area you will want to call around to the home offices for specific models in your area and ask about the executive or company cars available.

The final option for nearly new cars is to look into rental cars that are being sold of by the agencies at their lots and at special locations. They offer mainly the same pros and cons as a program car. The biggest difference is that rental agencies often do not include any negotiation room on the price, but rather just charge a flat take it or leave it price. These prices are often awesome deals but you need to find the right ones. It is still highly highly recommended for even these cars that you bring in an independent mechanic to inspect the car and make sure you are getting a good deal on it.


Audi A7 For Sale

The New Honda Insight - A 60 Miles Per Gallon Car?

Car dealers can be pretty intimidating when you're getting ready to buy a new car. For most people a new car is probably the second biggest purchase you'll make in your lifetime. So I was a bit nervous in the beginning. I figured the dealer would try to pull one over on me because I'm a women (and blonde, don't laugh) so I decided to get some real advice from someone who new what they were talking about. I went to a former car salesman and fortunately for me he had no problem revealing all the secrets the dealers used to manipulate the average person. He told me things that really gave me an edge up on the dealers like how not to let the sales agent out talk me. How to plan through my negotiating before I even enter the dealership. He told me things like...

*Why I shouldn't hide my trade in until we got to negotiating my new car purchase. Sales agents are willing to give on certain aspects of the sale if they know they may be able to make additional cash on your trade-in.

*To get the best deal for your old car you need to sell it yourself to an individual. A lot of people would rather not go to the trouble of placing ads and selling your old car yourself but that's how you are going to get the most money for your trade-in.

*How to get the best financing rate (saved me tons!) Before you even leave the house, find out what your credit score is. Many times the dealer financing is not lowest rate you can get depending on your credit score. So you if know that up front you know what rate you should be accepting.

*How the "no hassle pricing" system works and how it actually makes you pay more. There are many fees that are added on to the price of the vehicle after you agree upon a price. Make sure all the fees are already accounted for when you agree upon a price.

*How to save on new car accessories. These are something that can "negotiated" to complete the sale if you've made your plan before you walk into the dealership.

*What a "documentation fee" is. This is a fee that covers the cost of paperwork and documentation. These fees vary from state to state. So find out whether your state has standardized fees or it is determined by the dealership so that you know what that fee should be.

*The best time of week and year to buy a new car. The best time of week to buy a car is mid-week and the best time of year is toward the end of the year.

*Lifetime Warranties. That's usually only if you own the car and if you've done certain maintenance items by certain dates, etc. etc. etc. so make sure you read the fine print on that "Lifetime Warranty".

You can also limit the time you have to spend at the dealership by using the internet to research the kind of car you want. You'll save time, energy and money once you become comfortable using online buying resources that most dealerships have available. The world wide web is a great place to help you easily determine what you want, the features that you want on your new car, where you can find it, and what you should expect to pay for it. You no longer have to deal with high pressure auto dealers. You can actually get the dealers competing for your business before you ever leave home!

So if you're looking for new car buying advice do your homework before you ever enter the dealership. You'll be glad you did!


FloridaCarsDealerships.Com | Porsche Cayman For Sale Miami

Car Deals & Incentives in Miami

Subaru Forester For Sale

You can get creative if you’re looking for the lowest price on a new convertible. But when you are seeking the best without the ordinary haggle give is a try.

We make your new car purchase as easy as possible.    

  • Start your search by filling imputing your request on the search engine
  • Verify the results of the CarSearch.Online search engine
  • Create side-by-side comparisons of features, specs, prices
  • Discover all the latest rebates and incentives in Miami
  • Once you’ve chosen the right SUV push the button and wait for a quote

Remember that with CarSearch.Online what you do is completely anonymous. Brokers don’t know who you are and your information is never disclosed. So, with that said hold back, there is no hurry choose right options and colors with our vehicle configuration tool. Don’t lose sight of the  CarSearch.Online Target Price Calculator it will updates in real time as you add or subtract features.

New BMW 5-Series For Sale Financing Options in Miami

Once you have selected your new truck, we need to talk about financing. The majority of new buyers chosedealership financing. In dealership financing, another common type of vehicle financing, you get financing through the dealership. You and a dealer enter into a contract where you buy a vehicle and agree to pay, over a period of time, the amount financed plus a finance charge. The dealer may retain the contract, but typically sells it to a bank, finance company or credit union called an assignee that services the account and collects your payments.


Kia Soul For Sale

My Neighbor Got A New Car

The new car sales process has a language all it's own, and terms are frequently used that many don't fully understand. By not understanding the meaning of some of these terms, buyers are kept in the dark and spend more than they should. So let's review some of the new car buying terminology and what it really means.

* Manufacturer's Suggested Retail Price (MSRP) - This is found on the new car window sticker and is for many practical car buying purposes, useless to the consumer. It is, as the name says, only a "suggested" retail price. The dealer can sell that vehicle for more or less than that figure at any time.

* Optional equipment. This is also listed on the window sticker and details what options are installed on this vehicle and how much they cost at retail, if anything.

* Destination charge. Basically this is a shipping charge to get the vehicle from the manufacturer to the dealer and is not an amount that can be negotiated.

* Addendum sticker - This an added sticker that is often placed to the side of the manufacturer's sticker that lists extra options or equipment that the dealer is charging for above and beyond the MSRP or retail price. What you see on this sticker is completely negotiable and often contains highly inflated prices on items like rustproofing, fabric protectant, alarm systems, and so forth. This is an area where you need to be a savvy shopper and refuse to pay for exorbitant accessories.

* Dealer Invoice - This is the invoice to the dealer supposedly listing what the dealer actually pays for the vehicle at wholesale cost. However, it is rarely the actual cost of the vehicle itself due to other incentives listed below. If a dealer shows you his factory invoice and claims that is what he paid for the car, it's often not the case.

* Rebate - A discount given to any buyer of a particular vehicle by the manufacturer. Remember that it comes from the manufacturer, not the dealer, so it does not affect what the dealer actually paid for that vehicle., or the price that you negotiate with them.

* Dealer Incentives - This is money that the manufacturer pays the dealer for selling certain vehicles, especially those that are slow movers. This is not announced to the public, but is often listed on some car sales websites online and in Consumer Reports. It's good to keep up on these incentives as they provide more information on what a dealers is actually paying for a particular vehicle.

* Dealer Holdback - This an amount that is usually %2-3 of the MSRP that the manufacturer rebates to the dealer for selling a vehicle, no matter what price the dealer negotiates with you. Again, this is a way of the dealer making money even if he sells the vehicle to you at Dealer Invoice.

Knowing what all these terms mean and how they figure into buying a new car is important because they allow the buyer to establish the true wholesale cost instead of negotiating higher figures that allow the dealer to make unreasonable profits.


List of SUV Available at CarSearch.Online

 


Subaru Legacy For Sale

New Line of Honda Cars

I had been thinking about buying a car for two years. After another $1000 of repairs on my 1994 Buick Roadmaster (purchased new) with over180,000 miles, it was time. In the past, when I sat in a new car (at dealers and at auto shows), the comfort did not match my Buick's "sofa like" seat so I put off buying. During the past 24 months I determined the make and model but not the color; thus one Friday my plan was to check the colors at a local dealer. Later, the best price would be obtained via online bidding - a proven way to obtain a competitive price.

After arriving, the salesman took some basic information and asked how much time was available. My response was 15 to 30 minutes. Four hours later, I left without buying because the "deal" was on a car with the light interior not the dark that was my preference. In retrospect, what transpired in those four hours was a demonstration of classic car sales techniques at their best. This realization came to light a few days later when watching a movie where the sales manager highlighted the tricks of the trade, he gloated on how to manipulate the customer. After the movie, I said: "this is exactly what happened to me". Of the 14 techniques used during my four-hour ordeal, all were referenced in the movie (except in the movie a secret microphone captured the conversation between husband and wife after the salesman left the room - this did not occur). The amazing thing is that I did not realize the sales tricks during the process. What were the techniques?

First, in the parking lot the salesman turned his back and said follow me to the office and I did. Next, he obtained keys for the model of interest and positioned the car so I could sit in it. Although, I have driven the model before, he insisted it was no problem. After 15 minutes we returned to the office to say goodbye, how naive.

The third technique was offering a deal that could not be refused. He quoted a trade offer two times the value of my car and eight thousand dollars off the list price! My thought, this is too good to be true. My response, need to check with the wife. No problem, he offered the use of his cell phone, technique four, remove obstacles. Now the hook was set, he had a possible buyer. After driving a second car of my preferred color, we were back at the office.

My trade was the next topic. He filled out the paper work to determine the value via an online wholesale system. He offered one thousand more than the value which somehow made me feel good even though it was one thousand less than his first offer. This was trick five. Keeping my keys, trick six.

It was next revealed that the eight thousand discount first quoted was on a demo with 4,000 miles; thus we discontinued negotiations on that car, rather, the focus shifted to the one I just drove. He said they wanted to close the first sale of the day to get things rolling, thus a big discount, trick seven. The next question was what price would close the deal; He asked me to sign on a scratch pad how much I would pay, trick eight. Any amount was ok, if it were unreasonable, he would fight with his manager for me, technique nine, the salesman was on my side.

The manager arrives. He says he would be losing money on this deal, " it cost more to produce the car than you are offering". Obviously, unreasonable offers were not acceptable. He then starts the negotiations with the msrp and drops a thousand; our prior negotiations were lost somehow, trick ten. Since the car has more options than requested, a lecture on their value follows. When I request a basic version, the manager actually gets mad implying how much better discount is available with options, trick eleven - intimidation. After the manager leaves, the salesman uses trick twelve, ten thousand down with three year payments and list price. This came out of the blue since from the beginning the premise was a cash deal. However, it must be a standard practice.

The manager returned with a better offer, his lowest possible price. Actually he is losing money and will have to take the loss from his department budget, trick thirteen. Technique fourteen, a one-time offer, is highlighted by the question from both sales staff: do we have a deal at this price? By this time, I am not sure if the deal is reasonable since so many numbers have been discussed. The manager places a gong on the table to announce the first deal of the day. I am holding the pen to sign when my gut says no, wait for the exact car - do not compromise on the desired interior; and, do not succumb to these pressure tactics. Somehow I manage to obtain my keys and leave as an exhausted individual.

My story ends when I purchase the exact car I wanted from another dealer at a good but not great price, the negotiation involved an offer and a counter offer via email. Since my nerves were shot; I could not tolerate any more hassle or pressure. If acknowledging these crafty and subtle techniques will make the job of buying a car easier for someone, then my experience has some value.

Jim Johnson, July 2007


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